Karate Issues - Child Protection in Sport

The following document has been reproduced with the kind permission of the NSPCC Child Protection in Sport Unit who work closely with Sport England to help safeguard children and young people in sport.

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The NSPCC Child Protection in Sport Unit was established to work with sport organisations to provide support and advice on developing child protection policies and procedures in order to help them safeguard children and young people. These standards provide a framework for all those involved in sport to help them create a safe sporting environment for children and young people and protect them from harm.
The standards also seek to provide a benchmark to help those involved in sport make informed decisions, and to promote good practice and challenge practice that is harmful to children. The NSPCC Child Protection in Sport Unit is committed to advising and supporting sports organisations in this important work and they hope these standards will provide them with the confidence to safeguard children in their care.
This second edition of the standards incorporates an additional tenth standard. Standard 10 reflects the changes within sport and the growing role some sports organisations have in influencing the delivery of local sports. Through this sport organisations have the opportunity to encourage and promote the adoption and implementation of measures to safeguard children by partner organisations.
Steve Boocock Child Protection in Sport Unit Director

Introduction
The following standards have been developed in order to help safeguard and protect children and young people in sport. The standards are based on current good practice and are informed by legislation and guidance; evidence from research; and experience of what works, drawing from the field of child protection and from sport.
The need for standards was identified in the Child Protection in Sport Action Plan published in 2000. Initial work was done by Sport England Governing Body services, who consulted on Towards a Standard for Sport. This work was taken forward and built on by the Sport Task Force on policy and standards, whose membership is listed at the end of this document.
There has been extensive consultation on the standards, which has included Governing Bodies, County Sport Partnership, the Chief Officers of Leisure Services, Local Safeguarding Children Boards (LSCBs), Government Departments and all bodies represented on the Sport Steering Group. The standards received strong support from those consulted, and were endorsed by the Steering Group in September 2002.

A number of benefits were identified by those consulted:

  • for children and young people.
  • for parents and carers.
  • for those working in sport.
  • for the organisations themselves.

For example, the standards provide a national benchmark of good practice to work towards. They raise awareness and help organisations know what they need to do to protect children involved in sport and to minimise avoidable risks. When implemented fully they should provide parents with increased confidence and peace of mind. Most important of all, they should help create safer environments for children, where they can enjoy and get the very best from their involvement in sport.

Purpose of standards

  • To help create a safe sporting environment for children and young people and protect them from harm.
  • To provide a benchmark to assist those involved in sport to make informed decisions.
  • To promote good practice and challenge practice that is harmful to children.

The terms “children and young people” and “children” will be used interchangeably in the text to refer to those under 18 years of age.
Harm may result from sexual exploitation, physical abuse or emotional abuse or neglect, harm from bad practice or undue pressure that effects the child/young person’s health and development.
Decisions may be about whether to allow use of facilities, funding or affiliation, for example.

Principles

  • Children and young people have a right to enjoy sport, free from all forms of abuse and exploitation.
  • All children and young people have equal rights to protection from harm.
  • All children and young people should be encouraged to fulfil their potential and inequalities should be challenged.
  • Everybody has a responsibility to support the care and protection of children.
  • Sporting organisations have a duty of care to children and young people who take part in sport.

Use and application of the standards
These are overarching standards, which are intended to be relevant to all sports at all levels. They apply to sporting activity that takes place in an organised setting.
Umbrella, funding and controlling bodies may choose to use them for a variety of purposes, for example, to raise standards, to assist in decision making or for enforcement purposes.

Standard 1 Policy
What?
Any organisation providing services or activities for children and young people under the age of 18 should have a child protection policy. This is a statement of intent that demonstrates a commitment to safeguard children involved in sport from harm.

Why?
A child protection policy makes clear to all what is required in relation to the protection of children and young people. It helps to create a safe and positive environment for children and to show that the organisation is taking its duty of care seriously.

Criteria

1.1 The organisation has a child protection policy.
1.2 The policy is written in a clear and easily understood way.
1.3 The policy is publicised, promoted and distributed to relevant audiences.
1.4 The policy is approved and endorsed by the relevant management body (eg, Senior Management Board, Executive, Committee).
1.5 The policy is mandatory for staff and volunteers.
1.6 The policy is reviewed every three years or whenever there is a major change in the organisation or in relevant legislation.

Essential inclusions

  • All children and young people have a right to protection.
  • The welfare of children and young people is paramount.
  • Identity of the organisation.
  • Who the policy applies to.

Ways of providing evidence

  • A copy of the policy.
  • A circulation list that shows who the policy was distributed to.
  • Examples of ways in which policy was promoted.
  • A signed statement of approval of policy, or excerpt from minutes of relevant meeting to show approval.
  • Written evidence or process and timetable for review.

Standard 2 Procedures and systems
What?
Procedures provide clear step-by-step guidance on what to do in different circumstances. They clarify roles and responsibilities, and lines of communication. Systems for recording information and for dealing with complaints are also needed, to ensure procedures are implemented and complied with.

Why?
Procedures help to ensure a prompt response to concerns about a child’s safety or welfare. They also help an organisation to comply with and implement legislation and guidance.

Criteria

2.1 There are clear and unambiguous procedures in place in respect of child protection, which provide step-by-step guidance on what action to take if there are concerns about a child’s safety or welfare.
2.2 The child protection procedures are available to all (including children and young people and their parents/carers) and actively promoted on joining organisation.
2.3 At a national level child protection procedures are consistent with Working Together to Safeguard Children. At a local level there is a need to be aware of Local Safeguarding Children Board (LSCB) arrangements and contacts.
2.4 There is a designated person/s with clearly defined role and responsibilities in relation to child protection, which are appropriate to the level at which he/she operates.
2.5 There is a process for recording incidents, concerns and referrals and storing these securely in compliance with relevant legislation.
2.6 There is a process for dealing with complaints by parents/carers and by young people about unacceptable and/or abusive behaviour towards children, with clear timescales for resolving the complaint.
2.7 There is guidance on confidentiality and information sharing.

Essential inclusions

  • How to respond to a child who says either they or another child is/are being abused.
  • How to respond to allegations against a member of staff/volunteer or another young person.
  • How to respond to concerns about a child’s welfare where no specific disclosure/allegation.
  • Contact details for local social services and police, including out of hours contacts.
  • Use of video and photography at events.
  • Who procedures apply to.
  • Definitions of abuse.
  • Particular vulnerability of some groups of children, including disabled children.

Ways of providing evidence

  • A copy of procedures.
  • A flow chart/process map.
  • The name and responsibilities of designated person/s at different levels of sport.
  • An example of recording forms.

Standard 3 Prevention
What?
Measures to help minimise the possibility of children and young people being abused by those in a position of trust.

Why?
Some people, who work or seek to work in sport in a paid or voluntary capacity, pose a risk to children and young people. It is possible to minimise the risks and to prevent abuse by putting safeguards in place.

Criteria

3.1 There are policies and procedures for recruiting staff and volunteers who have contact with children, and for assessing their suitability to work with children.
3.2 All those who have significant contact with children complete a self-declaration about previous convictions and are subject to safeguarding checks, as required by legislation and guidance and these are properly recorded.
3.3 There are well-publicised ways in which staff and volunteers can raise concerns, confidentially if necessary, about unacceptable behaviour by other staff or volunteers. These include external contacts.
3.4 A safeguarding plan and guidance are in place in relation to transporting children or taking them away on trips, tournaments and tours.
3.5 Where there is direct responsibility for running/providing activities, operating standards are set out to ensure children are adequately supervised at all times.

Essential inclusions

  • At least two appropriate references are taken up for all staff and volunteers who have significant contact with children, and evidence of identity and any relevant qualifications are seen.
  • Application of recruitment policy to all those in contact with children.

Ways of providing evidence

  • A copy of recruitment policy and procedures.
  • Examples of application, reference and declaration forms.
  • A copy of the whistle-blowing scheme and publicity about it.
  • Example of child welfare plan for transporting children or taking them on trips.
  • Registration with or access to the Criminal Records Bureau.

Designated person/s. Governing Bodies and other sports organisations should have a named person/s who is/are responsible for the implementation of the child protection policy. This role should reflect the nature and structure of the organisation and should have sufficient seniority and support to carry out the role.

At club or facility level there should be named person/s who people can talk to about child protection matters.

Standard 4 Codes of practice and behaviour
What?
Codes of practice describe what is an acceptable standard of behaviour and promote good practice.

Why?
Children’s sport should be carried out in a safe, positive and encouraging atmosphere. Standards of behaviour for all set a clear benchmark of what is acceptable. They can help minimise opportunities for abuse and help to prevent unfounded allegations.

Criteria

4.1 There is a code of ethics.
4.2 The organisation provides guidance on appropriate/expected standards of behaviour of adults towards children and young people.
4.3 There is guidance on expected and acceptable behaviour of children towards other children.
4.4 There are processes for dealing with behaviour that is unacceptable.
4.5 All disciplinary measures/sanctions are non-violent and do not involve humiliating children and young people.
4.6 Managers and senior staff promote a culture that ensures children are listened to and respected as individuals.

Essential inclusions

  • Codes for adults and for children.
  • Discrimination; prejudice; oppressive behaviour or language in relation to any of the following are not acceptable – race, culture, age, gender, disability, religion, sexuality or political persuasion.
  • Guidelines, where relevant, on the intimate care of disabled children or young people, including appropriate and inappropriate touch.

Ways of providing evidence

  • Copy of codes of conduct for adult-child behaviour and for child-child behaviour.
  • Guidance on physical contact.

Standard 5 Equity
What?
Measures to ensure the needs of all children and young people to be protected from abuse are addressed.

Why?
Abuse happens to male and female children of all ages, ethnicity and social backgrounds, abilities, sexual orientation, religious belief and political persuasion. Some children, such as disabled children, are particularly vulnerable. Prejudice and discrimination can prevent some children getting the help they need. Organisations should take steps to combat discrimination and actively include all children and young people in their safeguarding measures.

Criteria

5.1 The child protection policy makes it clear that all children have equal rights to protection.
5.2 The child protection procedures, guidance and training help staff and volunteers to recognise the additional vulnerability of some children and the extra barriers they face to getting help, because of their race, gender, age, religion or disability, sexual orientation, social background and culture.
5.3 Codes of conduct/behaviour include statements about the responsibility of adults and children to treat one another with dignity, respect, sensitivity and fairness.
5.4 Codes of conduct/behaviour make it clear that discriminatory, offensive and violent behaviour are unacceptable and that complaints will be acted upon.
5.5 Processes for dealing with complaints are fair and open to challenge through an appeals process.

Ways of providing evidence

  • An equity policy or statement.
  • Copies of excerpts from relevant policies, procedures and codes of behaviour.
  • Examples of how training programmes address issues of equality and child protection.
  • Copy of complaints and appeals procedures.

Standard 6 Communication
What?
Ways of informing, consulting and listening to all relevant parties about how children involved in the sport are to be safeguarded.

Why?
Policies and procedures are only effective if people are aware of them, have some ownership of them and have the opportunity to express their views on how they are working.

Criteria

6.1 Information about the organisation’s commitment to safeguard children and young people is openly displayed and available to all.
6.2 Children and young people are made aware of their right to be safe from abuse.
6.3 Information for young people and for parents is made available about where to go for help in relation to child abuse.
6.4 Information provided is in a format and language that can be easily understood by all service users.
6.5 Everyone in the organisation knows who is the designated person for child protection and how to contact them.
6.6 Contact details for the local social services department, police and emergency medical help and the NSPCC Child Protection Helpline are readily available.
6.7 Steps are taken to seek users’ views on policies and procedures and how they are working.

Ways of providing evidence

  • Examples of information products.
  • Mechanisms exist for young people’s views to be heard.

Standard 7 Education and training
What?
Opportunities to develop and maintain the necessary skills and understanding to safeguard children.

Why?
Everyone in contact with children has a role to play in their protection. They can only do so confidently and effectively if they are aware and have the necessary understanding and skills. Organisations providing sporting activities for children have a responsibility to provide training and development opportunities for staff and volunteers.

Criteria

7.1 There is an induction process for all staff and volunteers who have significant contact with children and young people, which includes familiarisation with the child protection policy and procedures.
7.2 All staff and volunteers are provided with opportunities to learn about how to recognise and respond to concerns about child abuse.
7.3 Staff and volunteers with special responsibilities in relation to safeguarding children have training to enable them to develop the necessary skills and knowledge and have regular opportunities to update their knowledge and understanding.
7.4 Training is provided to those responsible for dealing with complaints and disciplinary processes in relation to child abuse and inappropriate behaviour towards children and young people.
7.5 Training and written guidance on safer recruitment practice is provided for those responsible for recruiting and selecting staff and volunteers.

Ways of providing evidence

  • A copy of training plans and/or programmes.
  • Records of course attendance.
  • Induction documentation or guidance.
  • Course evaluations.

Standard 8 Access to advice and support
What?
Arrangements made to provide essential information and support to those responsible for safeguarding children. Children and young people who are being abused are assisted to get help.

Why?
Child abuse is distressing and can be difficult to deal with. Organisations have a duty to ensure advice and support are in place to help people to play their part in protecting children. Children need someone to turn to when they are being abused. Often they do not know where to turn for help.

Criteria

8.1 Children and young people are provided with information on where to go to for help and advice in relation to abuse, harassment and bullying.
8.2 Designated child protection staff have access to specialist advice, support and information.
8.3 Contacts are established at a national and/or local level with the key statutory child protection agencies or locally with the LSCB.
8.4 Arrangements are in place to provide support to individuals both during and following an incident or allegation of abuse, or a complaint.
8.5 There are arrangements for providing supervision and support to staff and volunteers during and following an incident or allegation.

Ways of providing evidence

  • Copies of information for children about sources of support.
  • Information about training, advice and support.
  • Lists of contacts for specialist advice and information.

Standard 9 Implementation and monitoring
What?
Action taken to ensure that the organisation’s intentions in relation to safeguarding children are taking place, and to monitor and evaluate action and effectiveness.

Why?
Policies, procedures and plans have to be implemented across and in all parts of the organisation. Checks are needed to ensure this is happening consistently. The views of those involved inside and outside the organisation can help to improve the effectiveness of any actions taken.

Criteria

9.1 There is a written plan showing what steps will be taken to safeguard children, who is responsible for what actions and when these will be completed.
9.2 The resources essential for implementing the plan are made available.
9.3 Policies and practices are reviewed at stated intervals, ideally at least every three years, and revised in the light of changing needs; changes in legislation and guidance; experience.
9.4 Processes/mechanisms are in place to consult children and young people and parents as part of the review of safeguarding policies and practices.
9.5 All incidents, allegations of abuse and complaints are recorded and monitored.
9.6 Arrangements are in place to monitor compliance with child protection policies and procedures and with recruitment and selection policies and procedures.

Ways of providing evidence

  • A copy of the safeguarding/child protection plan.
  • Date planned for review and who is responsible.
  • Anonymised summary of number of incidents of abuse and number of complaints.

Standard 10 Influencing
What?
Action taken by the organisation to influence, encourage, and promote the adoption and implementation of measures to safeguard children by partner organisations.

Why?
A number of sports organisations have both a strategic and a service/activity delivery role in relation to children and young people. Where partnership, funding or commissioning relationships exist or develop with other organisations, the organisation should use its influence to promote the implementation of safeguarding measures. Partnership, funding and commissioning criteria should include a requirement for child protection policies and procedures. The organisation provides or signposts support and resources in relation to implementing adequate safeguarding measures. The organisation actively promotes the adoption of the Standards for Safeguarding and Protecting Children in Sport.

Criteria

10.1 The organisation’s stance on safeguarding is made clear to all partners.
10.2 Partnership, funding and commissioning criteria include a requirement to address safeguarding.
10.3 The organisation actively promotes safeguarding within all partnership working and seeks to establish minimum safeguarding standards.
10.4 The organisation provides, or signposts, safeguarding support and resources to partner organisations.

Ways of providing evidence

  • Examples of partnership, funding or commissioning agreements referencing safeguarding requirements.
  • Information on the organisation’s positive stance on safeguarding that is provided to partners.
  • Examples of safeguarding resources made available to partners (eg template policies,
    procedures, guidelines, training), or methods to signpost partners to appropriate resources.
  • Minutes of local partnership safeguarding groups or other relevant fora.

Appendix one Policy standard criteria

Standard 1 – Child Protection Policy In place Proposed Not in place
1.1 The organisation has a child protection policy.      
1.2 The policy is written in a clear and easily understood way.      
1.3 The policy is publicised, promoted and distributed to relevant audiences.      
1.4 The policy is approved and endorsed by the relevant management body (eg, Senior Management Board, Executive, Committee).      
1.5 The policy is mandatory for staff and volunteers.      
1.6 The policy is reviewed every three years or whenever there is a major change in the organisation or in relevant legislation.      

 

Standard 2 – Procedures and systems In place Proposed Not in place
2.1 There are clear and unambiguous procedures in place in respect of child protection, which provide step-by-step guidance on what action to take if there are concerns about a child’s safety or welfare.      
2.2 The child protection procedures are available to all (including children and young people and their parents/carers) and actively promoted on joining organisation.      
2.3 At a national level child protection procedures are consistent with Working Together to Safeguard Children. At a local level there is a need to be aware of LSCB arrangements and contacts.      
2.4 There is a designated person/s with clearly defined role and responsibilities in relation to child protection, which are appropriate to the level at which he/she operates.      
2.5 There is a process for recording incidents, concerns and referrals and storing these securely in compliance with relevant legislation.      
2.6 There is a process for dealing with complaints by parents/carers and by young people about unacceptable and/or abusive behaviour towards children, with clear timescales for resolving the complaint.      
2.7 There is guidance on confidentiality and information sharing.      

 

Standard 3 – Prevention

In place Proposed Not in place
3.1 There are policies and procedures for recruiting staff and volunteers who have contact with children, and for assessing their suitability to work with children.      
3.2 All those who have significant contact with children complete a self-declaration about previous convictions and are subject to safeguarding checks, as required by legislation and guidance and these are properly recorded.      
3.3 There are well-publicised ways in which staff and volunteers can raise concerns, confidentially if necessary, about unacceptable behaviour by other staff or volunteers. These include external contacts.      
3.4 A safeguarding plan and guidance are in place in relation to transporting children or taking them away on trips, tournaments and tours.      
3.5 Where there is direct responsibility for running/providing activities, operating standards are set out to ensure children are adequately supervised at all times.      

 

Standard 4 – Codes of practice and behaviour In place Proposed Not in place
4.1 There is a code of ethics.      
4.2 The organisation provides guidance on appropriate/expected standards of behaviour of adults towards children and young people.      
4.3 There is guidance on expected and acceptable behaviour of children towards other children.      
4.4 There are processes for dealing with behaviour that is unacceptable.      
4.5 All disciplinary measures/sanctions are non-violent and do not involve humiliating children and young people.      
4.6 Managers and senior staff promote a culture that ensures children are listened to and respected as individuals.      

 

Standard 5 – Equity In place Proposed Not in place
5.1 The child protection policy makes it clear that all children have equal rights to protection.      
5.2 The child protection procedures, guidance and training help staff and volunteers to recognise the additional vulnerability of some children and the extra barriers they face to getting help, because of their race, gender, age, religion or disability, sexual orientation, social background and culture.      
5.3 Codes of conduct/behaviour include statements about the responsibility of adults and children to treat one another with dignity, respect, sensitivity and fairness.      
5.4 Codes of conduct/behaviour make it clear that discriminatory, offensive and violent behaviour are unacceptable and that complaints will be acted upon.      
5.5 Processes for dealing with complaints are fair and open to challenge through an appeals process.      

 

Standard 6 – Communication In place Proposed Not in place
6.1 Information about the organisation’s commitment to safeguard children and young people is openly displayed and available to all.      
6.2 Children and young people are made aware of their right to be safe from abuse.      
6.3 Information for young people and for parents is made available about where to go for help in relation to child abuse.      
6.4 Information provided is in a format and language that can be easily understood by all service users.      
6.5 Everyone in the organisation knows who is the designated person for child protection and how to contact them.      
6.6 Contact details for the local social services department, police and emergency medical help and the NSPCC Child Protection Helpline are readily available.      
6.7 Steps are taken to seek users’ views on policies and procedures and how they are working.      

 

Standard 7 – Education and training In place Proposed Not in place
7.1 There is an induction process for all staff and volunteers who have significant contact with children and young people, which includes familiarisation with the child protection policy and procedures.      
7.2 All staff and volunteers are provided with opportunities to learn about how to recognise and respond to concerns about child abuse.      
7.3 Staff and volunteers with special responsibilities in relation to safeguarding children have training to enable them to develop the necessary skills and knowledge and have regular opportunities to update their knowledge and understanding.      
7.4 Training is provided to those responsible for dealing with complaints and disciplinary processes in relation to child abuse and inappropriate behaviour towards children and young people.      
7.5 Training and written guidance on safer recruitment practice is provided for those responsible for recruiting and selecting staff and volunteers.      

 

Standard 8 – Access to advice and support In place Proposed Not in place
8.1 Children and young people are provided with information on where to go to for help and advice in relation to abuse, harassment and bullying.      
8.2 Designated child protection staff have access to specialist advice, support and information.      
8.3 Contacts are established at a national and/or local level with the key statutory child protection agencies or locally with the LSCB.      
8.4 Arrangements are in place to provide support to individuals both during and following an incident or allegation of abuse or a complaint.      
8.5 There are arrangements for providing supervision and support to staff and volunteers during and following an incident or allegation.      

 

Standard 9 – Implementation and monitoring In place Proposed Not in place
9.1 There is a written plan showing what steps will be taken to safeguard children, who is responsible for what actions and when these will be completed.      
9.2 The resources essential for implementing the plan are made available.      
9.3 Policies and practices are reviewed at stated intervals, ideally at least every three years, and revised in the light of changing needs; changes in legislation and guidance; experience.      
9.4 Processes/mechanisms are in place to consult children and young people and parents as part of the review of safeguarding policies and practices.      
9.5 All incidents, allegations of abuse and complaints are recorded and monitored.      
9.6 Arrangements are in place to monitor compliance with child protection policies and procedures and with recruitment and selection policies and procedures.      

 

Standard 10 – Influencing In place Proposed Not in place
10.1 The organisation’s stance on safeguarding is made clear to all partners.      
10.2 Partnership, funding and commissioning criteria include a requirement to address safeguarding.      
10.3 The organisation actively promotes safeguarding within all partnership working and seeks to establish minimum safeguarding standards.      
10.4 The organisation provides, or signposts to, safeguarding support and resources to partner organisations.      

Appendix two Resources
Sports check
This step-by-step guide helps sports clubs develop a child protection policy and procedures and recruit volunteers safely.

In at the deep end
This report provides practical guidance arising from a study into cases of child abuse within swimming.

Safesport away
This practical guide helps sports organisations involved in taking children and young people away from home to sports activities.

Safe Sports Events
This is a practical guide for all those involved in the planning and organising of any size and type of sporting event for children and young people.

Child Protection Policy and Implementation Procedures
This workbook offers guidelines to professional and voluntary organisations to adopt policies and implement procedures for administrators, coaches, instructors, officials, teachers, parents and young people.

Time to listen
Is a comprehensive training and information pack developed for people with designated responsibility for child protection/welfare in sports organisations. The reader provides key information needed and is an integral part of the Time to listen training pack.

All the above are available from the
Child Protection in Sport Unit, 3 Gilmour Close, Beaumont Leys, Leicester LE4 1EZ
Tel: 0116 234 7278
Email: cpsu@nspcc.org.uk
Website: www.thecpsu.org.uk

Protecting children: a guide for sports people
This is a training manual in home study format, written especially for coaches, sports leaders, sport governing bodies and local authorities.

Protecting disabled children and adults in sport
This provides specific information relating to work with disabled children and adults (available from Disability Sport England).

Code of ethics and conduct for sports coaches
A booklet adopted by many governing bodies of sport as their professional ethical framework for coaches.

Are your young people safe? Is your coaching sound?
A leaflet helping coaches create a safe sports environment for young people, adopting sound procedures, promoting young people’s welfare and protecting coaches against false allegations.

Guidelines for Governing Bodies and Local Authorities
How to develop policy and implementation procedures.

All the above are available from
Coachwise, Chelsea Close, off Amberley Road, Armley, Leeds LS12 4HP
Tel: 0113 201 5555
Website: www.1st4sport.com

Code of ethics and good practice for children’s sport
Sports Council Northern Ireland and Irish Sports Council.

Available from:
Child Protection in Sport Unit, Jennymount Court, North Derby St, Belfast BT15 3HN
Email: cpsu@nspcc.org.uk
Website: www.sportni.net

NSPCC EduCare Child protection awareness programme
Keeping Children Safe in Sport

Available from:
Educare, deBrus Marketing
Tel: 01926 426 219

Appendix three Resources
Strategy for Safeguarding Children and Young People in Sport, 2006 – 2012
NSPCC and Sport England (2006). Strategy for Safeguarding Children and Young People in Sport, 2006 – 2012.
Leicester: NSPCC Child Protection in Sport Unit.
Website: www.thecpsu.org.uk

Relevant legislation and guidance
The Children Act 1989 (England and Wales)
The Children (Scotland) Act 1995
The Children (Northern Ireland) Order 1995

Criminal Justice and Court Services Act 2000
For information on Part II of the Act write to:
Sentencing and Offences Unit, Home Office, 50 Queen Anne’s Gate, London SW1H 9AT
Website: www.legislation.gov.uk

The Data Protection Act 1984 and 1998
Website: www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1998/29/contents (the Act)

The Children Act 2004
Department for Education and Skills (2004). The Children Act 2004.
The Stationery Office Limited: London (ISBN 0 10 543104 4)
This provides the legal framework for the programme of reform in response to the findings of the Climbié Inquiry (Laming 2003). It is not intended to replace the Children Act 1989

Every Child Matters: Change for Children
Department for Education and Skills (2004). Every Child Matters: Change for Children
A major strategy in England launched to accompany the Children Act 2004 and intended to set the direction for the major new programme of change in the delivery of children’s services.
Website: www.everychildmatters.co.uk

The Human Rights Act 1998

The Protection of Children Act 1999
For information about the Department for Education and Skills’ safeguarding measures including the Protection of Children Act List and List 99 write to:
Children Safeguarding Team, Department for Education and Skills, Mowden Hall, Staindrop Road, Darlington, County Durham DL3 9BG
Website: www.gov.uk/dfe

For the National Assembly for Wales’ child protection measures, write to:
Children and Families Division, National Assembly for Wales, Cathays Park, Cardiff CF10 3NQ
Website: www.wales.gov.uk

For Scotland’s measures for checking whether an individual is disqualified from working with children, contact the Scottish Criminal Record Office.
Tel: 0141 585 8400
Disclosure Scotland has been operational since April 2002.
Website: www.disclosurescotland.co.uk

Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups Bill 2006
A significant step forward in ensuring that children are protected from people who may pose a risk to them.
Website: www.publications.parliament.uk

Sexual Offences (Amendments) Act 2000
Website: www.opsi.gov.uk

Sexual Offences Act 2003
Website: www.opsi.gov.uk

The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child
Website: www.un.org

Caring for young people and the vulnerable?
Home Office guidance for preventing the abuse of trust.
Website: www.homeoffice.gov.uk

Our Duty to Care
Principles of good practice for the protection of children and young people. Pack contains: brochure, some suggestions, action checklists and factsheets providing basic principles for assisting in the development of policy and procedures. Available from the Volunteer Development Agency
Tel: 028 9023 6100
Website: www.volunteering-ni.org

Safe from Harm
(Home Office 1993) The Code of Practice for Safeguarding the Welfare of Children in Voluntary Organisations in England and Wales.

People Like Us
Utting, W. (1997) People Like Us: The Report of the Review of the Safeguards for Children Living Away from Home, London: The Stationery Office

Lost in care
The Waterhouse Report into abuse in residential homes Waterhouse, R (2000) Lost in Care: Report of the Tribunal of Inquiry into the abuse of children in care in the former county council areas of Gwynedd and Clwyd since 1974. London: The Stationery Office

Working Together to Safeguard Children
Department for Education and Employment 2006
Website: www.gov.uk/dfe

What To Do If You’re Worried A Child Is Being Abused
Department of Health, Home Office, Department for Education & Skills, Department for Culture, Media and Sport (2003). What To Do If You’re Worried A Child Is Being Abused. DOH: London

The Bichard Inquiry Report
Home Office (2003). The Bichard Inquiry Report

(National Assembly for Wales 2000)
Health and Safety of Pupils on Educational Visits and Exchanges
Department for Education and Employment (1998)
Tel: 0808 100 50 60

Safe and Sound – building a safer youth work environment
Youth Clubs Scotland, Balfour House, 19 Bonnington Grove, Edinburgh EH6 4BL
Tel: 0131 554 2561
Email: info@ycs.org.uk

Let’s celebrate our differences – an anti-bullying strategy for youth workers
J.Morton and S.Henderson
Children’s Work Fund (1996), Lothian Association of Youth Clubs, Dunford House, Boroughloch Lane, Edinburgh EH8 9NL

Useful contacts
National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC)
Publications and Information Unit, NSPCC, Weston House, 42 Curtain Road, London EC2A 3NH
Tel: 020 7825 2775
Website: www.nspcc.org.uk
Website: www.nspcc.org.uk/inform
The UK’s only free, online specialised child protection resource.

Child Protection in Sport Unit (England)
NSPCC National Training Centre, 3 Gilmour Close, Beaumont Leys, Leicester LE4 1EZ
Tel: 0116 234 7278
Email: cpsu@nspcc.org.uk
Website: www.thecpsu.org.uk
Working in partnership with all key stakeholders in sport to develop safeguards for children in sport.

Sport England
3rd Floor, Victoria House, Bloomsbury Square, London WC1B 4SE
Tel: 020 7273 1500
Website: www.sportengland.org
Sport England aims to lead the development of sport in England by influencing and serving the public, commercial and voluntary sectors.

Sports Coach UK
114 Cardigan Road, Leeds LS6 3BJ
Tel: 01509 226 130
Email: bsc@sportscoachuk.org
Website: www.sportscoachuk.org
Guiding the development and implementation of a coaching system recognised as a world leader, for all coaches at every level in the UK.

Criminal Records Bureau
PO Box 91, Liverpool L69 2UH
Helpline: 0870 90 90 811
Website: www.crb.gov.uk
An executive agency of the Home Office (www.homeoffice.gov.uk). It enables organisations to make more thorough recruitment checks, particularly for positions that involve regular contact with children and vulnerable adults.

Children 1ST
83 Whitehouse Loan, Edinburgh EH9 1AT
Tel: 0131 446 2300
Website: www.children1st.org.uk
Charity supporting families under stress, protecting children from harm and neglect.

The Department of Education and Skills’ website of LSCBs
Website: www.gov.uk/dfe
Provides information about Local Safeguarding Children Boards and the inter-agency work they undertake to safeguard children in their area from abuse and neglect.

Home Office
Website: www.homeoffice.gov.uk
The Government department responsible for internal affairs in England and Wales. The purpose: to work with individuals and communities to build a safe, just and tolerant society enhancing opportunities for all and in which rights and responsibilities go hand in hand, and the protection and security of the public are maintained and enhanced.

Acknowledgements
Members of the Task Force

    • Steve Brewster - Sport England.
    • Steve Boocock - Child Protection in Sport Unit Director.
    • Linda Bishop-Bailey - Silverstone.
    • Barbara Barrett - Amateur Swimming Association.
    • Enid Hendry (chair) - NSPCC Head of Child Protection Training and Consultancy.
    • Huw Jennings - Southampton Football Club.
    • Jenny Myers - NSPCC – National Training Development Officer.
    • Matthew McFahn - English Federation of Disability Sports.
    • Tony Pickerin - The Football Association.
    • Caroline Stoke - Department of Culture, Media and Sport.
    • Ian Smyth - Sportscoach UK.
    • Anne Tiivas - CPSU National Development Officer.
    • Lisa Wainwright - Sport England.
    • Rob Wallace - Active Sports – Saffron Lane Sports Club.

In addition, advice has been provided by:

    • Professor Celia Brackenridge - Chair of Research Task Force.
    • Lisa MacHendry - Chair of Children’s Participation Task Force.
    • Simon Nathan - Central Council of Physical Recreation.
    • Nick Slinn - CPSU National Development Officer (responsible for development of Standard 10).
    • Gill Joyce - CPSU National Development Officer.

These standards have been the subject of extensive consultation and we are grateful to all those who contributed through their feedback.
These standards have been developed by the Task Force on Policy and Standards, co-ordinated by the Child Protection in Sport Unit.

Don’t keep it to yourself
NSPCC Child Protection
Helpline: 0808 800 5000
A free 24-hour service which provides counselling, information and advice to anyone concerned about a child at risk of abuse.

NSPCC Textphone (for people who are deaf or hard of hearing)
Tel: 0800 056 0566
Email: help@nspcc.org.uk

NSPCC Asian Child Protection
Helpline: 0800 096 7719 (Mon–Fri 11am–7pm)

NSPCC Cymru/Wales Child
Protection Helpline: 0808 100 2524 (Mon–Fri 10am–6pm)

ChildLine: 0800 1111
A free 24-hour helpline for children in distress or danger.

Swimline:
Tel: 0808 100 4001/ 0800 731 7466

(English) Football Association Child Protection
Helpline: 0808 800 5000

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